Direct-hire Solution Architect Opportunity in Plano, TX

SR. SOLUTION ARCHITECT

What’s the role?

The role of Solutions Architect is to provide technical guidance and direction for more than one business applications and technologies within Global Application Software. This position is responsible for designing software solutions that are modular, reliable and extensible, conforming to sound design principles and capable of adapting to change while achieving targets for performance and scalability. The Solutions Architect works closely with various team members to drive operational excellence and deliver products which set this company apart from the competition and actively engage our customers.

What does the role involve?

Assume responsibility to architect, implement and optimize more than one area of application design and development; drive one or more parts of a larger multi-system initiative
Produce solution designs to be fleshed out and implemented by development teams – this may include proofs of concept, development activities, cost/benefit analysis, training, configuration, service level requirements
Conduct research on new and emerging technologies for practical application to business problems and strategic initiatives; identify new components to be procured or developed; provide short term solutions, as well as clear evolution paths and long-term architecture strategy
Identify, analyze, and communicate architecture and integration options; document best practices and solution blueprints
Interact with business unit management, company IT, vendors and industry experts to collect requirements, understand options and determine solutions
Apply established architectural principles and application of technology solutions to multiple business processes and technologies
Assist development leads to implement architectural strategies and the proper use of enterprise and application design patterns
Additional duties, as assigned

What you need is:

  • Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering or related field (or equivalent work experience)
  • Minimum five (5) years’ experience in software development more than one programming languages, including at least one object-oriented language
  • Minimum two (2) years’ experience in the Solutions Architect role with design pattern experience, designing systems that include more than one of the following areas: user interface, services, data, integration, deployment, Cloud
  • Real-world practical experience applying enterprise, domain and software design patterns; strong software development skills in C# and .NET; some knowledge of JavaScript/TypeScript required, Angular, Microservices
  • Experience in architecture and implementation of microservice-based web, desktop and/or mobile applications; ability to understand practical aspects and avoid common pitfalls
  • Applied analytical thinking and proven structured engineering approach to complex solution design/implementation and problem resolution; ability to anticipate technical trends in defined and relevant IT areas
  • Rich architecture knowledge based on experience and training/education
  • Competence in API design and development across more than one digital platform and client form factors, for example, web, desktop, mobile, IoT
  • Developed software for distributed enterprise systems touching multiple areas like user experience, authentication/authorization, integration, and data
  • Expertise in one or more of the following areas: data architecture, systems integration, application security, Cloud platforms, client UI frameworks, mobile, DevOps, process automation, AI/machine learning
  • Strong desire to continually study and learn the latest and new technologies and related architectures, especially microservice architectures and cloud technologies
  • Proficient in agile development methodologies and testing approaches, distributed version control, git workflow and branching strategies, application monitoring, CI/CD pipelines
  • Strong communication skills (written and verbal) with the ability to create documentation materials for appropriate audiences
  • Experience working with geographically distributed development teams a plus
  • Advanced troubleshooting and debugging skills
  • Normal office conditions. Up to 20% domestic and international travel, required

If you have this experience, feel you are a fit for this position, and are interested, please answer the questions below:

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Position You Are Applying For?

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Regards,

Mike Hanes
ProVisionTech

7 business skills every IT leader needs to succeed

Today’s CIO needs more than technology mastery. Long-term career success also demands a commitment to developing a set of core business skills.

The days when CIOs could glide into a long-term career based solely on their technical abilities are rapidly fading.

“It’s no longer enough for IT leaders to be tech experts,” warns Bob Hersch, a principal at Deloitte Consulting. The best-in-class CIOs of today are also business savvy, using their knowledge to embed IT as a service capability.

“This business-centric approach integrates IT into an overall business strategy,” he adds.

The best way any IT leader can augment his or her current technical knowledge — and strengthen their long-term career prospects — is by committing to acquiring the following seven essential business skills.

1. An entrepreneurial mindset

CIOs, regardless of their organization’s size, have to act like entrepreneurs, operating with speed, agility, and ever higher levels of passion, empathy, and creativity, advises Ram Nagappan, CIO at global investment firm BNY Mellon Pershing.

Disruption is the new constant. “Competition is coming from all corners of the market, with fintechs and startups moving at light speed,” Nagappan says. To meet competition head on, CIOs must think like entrepreneurs and act as agents of change. “They need to constantly think about how their business could be disrupted at any point in time and how they can creatively deploy technology to get ahead of potential disruptors and future-proof the business,” he suggests.

2. Strong leadership skills

Leadership is a core competency that paves the way to successful technology transformation. “To truly lead, you must have business acumen in addition to technical understanding,” explains Richard Cox, CIO at media conglomerate Cox Enterprises. “Our jobs are really to leverage technology to unleash the potential of the business, and you simply have to have an understanding of the business landscape in order to exploit these opportunities.”[ Looking to upgrade your career in tech? This comprehensive online course teaches you how. ]

Leadership is a combination of internal and external engagement. The problems CIOs face today are growing increasingly complex. The future is ambiguous, and answers are often not clear or simple. “The only way to navigate in … these uncharted waters, is to build an environment that allows people to bring ideas, perspectives, and input to solve problems,” Cox says. “Building teams that create aligned empowerment is more important today than ever.”

Poor IT leaders often make the mistake of setting project plans, gate reviews, and delivery dates without educating the IT team on the who, what, when, and why of how the effort will help the enterprise, says Harley Bledsoe, CIO at BBB National Programs, a nonprofit organization that oversees more than a dozen industry self-regulation programs that sets standards for business advertising and privacy practices.

“Bringing the team along on the journey as they execute on their deliverables is critical to developing an effective solution,” he explains.

Read more HERE

7 IT leadership lessons learned from COVID-19

IT leaders from HP, McAfee, Johnson Controls, and other enterprises reflect on what they learned after leading teams through a full year of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a global pandemic on March 11, 2020, and soon after IT leaders rushed to mitigate the impact on their businesses, marshaling teams to work remotely.

CIOs boosted infrastructure capacity, shipped laptops to residences, and migrated applications small and large to software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications and cloud software. Eighty-two percent of CIOs surveyed say they have implemented new technologies and IT strategies during the pandemic, according to IDG’s 2021 State of the CIO survey.

Beyond implementing new technologies at scale, CIOs embraced the mental-health hurdles associated with managing remote teams whose work-life balance has been disrupted.

“Like most organizations, the pandemic took us by surprise,” says Paul Herring, global chief innovation officer of accounting firm RSM International. “We had to adjust quickly.”

Here IT leaders reflect on what they learned from a year of leading teams during the pandemic, as well as how work will likely change going forward.

1. The way we work changed overnight
2. Collaboration evolved — but left spontaneity a little lacking
3. Product expedition became a priority
4. Automation curbed uncertainty
5. IT leaders learned to lead with empathy
6. The customer meeting flight may now be canceled
7. It may no longer matter where employees reside

Read more details HERE

Direct-hire Manager, Human Resources Business Partner Opportunity in Irving, TX

Company Description

This company is the leader in outcome-based marketing. We enable marketing that’s built on proof, not promises. Through the company’s PeopleCloud, the marketing platform for personalizing consumer journeys with performance transparency, the company helps marketers anticipate, activate and prove measurable business outcomes. Powered by CORE ID®, the most accurate and stable identity management platform representing 200+ million people, this company’s award-winning data and technology is rooted in privacy by design and underpinned by powerful AI. With more than 50 years of experience in personalization and performance working with the world’s top brands, agencies and publishers, this company is a trusted partner leading CRM, digital media, loyalty and email programs. Positioned at the core of Publicis Groupe, this client is a global company with over 8,000 employees in over 40 offices around the world.

Job Description

Role Summary: 

The Human Resources Business Partner position is a key role that partners with management on business decisions related to personnel and supports all Human Resource-related activity for various client groups. Responsibilities include an emphasis on employee relations management and performance management. Through active listening, sound advice and effective coaching, the HRBP will build trusted relationships with leaders, managers and employees. This is role will be based in Irving, TX. This role will serve as a HR business partner for the company client group(s) within the Technology Practice. Note: This position will be 100% remote until the company’s offices reopen. Timing TBD.

Responsibilities:

  • Interact and engage with all levels of associate population. Additionally, be able to work across all levels of the organization in a dynamic highly matrixed, team environment
  • Support, investigate, counsel, and coach in the following ways:
    • Conduct investigations on claims received
    • Prepare and execute RIFs and involuntary terminations
    • Work with managers to create and deliver written disciplinary actions
    • Ensure that employees receive timely, objective and actionable feedback
    • Assist in maintaining a positive work environment
    • Work closely with management and employees to improve work relationships, increase employee engagement and morale, and increase productivity and retention.
    • Partner with managers on delivering and maintaining Performance Improvement Plans
  • Responsible for day-to-day and project based involvement with other HR Centers of Excellence, including Talent Acquisition, Benefits, Payroll, Talent Management, Learning and Organizational Development, and Compensation.
  • Drive overall HR initiatives such as: annual merit process, performance management lifecycle, mentoring, recognition initiatives, HRIS reporting, associate survey reporting, etc.
  • Ensure adherence to company policies and procedures. Apply knowledge of HR practices & principles and the laws and regulations affecting HR.
  • Support in-person initiatives (i.e. One company meetings) in Wakefield and Boston offices
  • Serve as first point-of-contact and go-to person for Wakefield and Boston associates
  • Run various HRIS reports to create routine and ad hoc reports for your needs, and your clients’ needs including turnover analysis, recognition reports, promotion reports, etc.
  • Ability to manage multiple demands simultaneously and meet aggressive deadlines.
  • Conduct exit interviews; provide feedback to your clients on key themes while maintaining the confidentiality of individuals. Document resignation trends and coach leadership on ways to minimize voluntary turnover.
  • Coach and advise employees on problem resolution; help them identify solutions and encourage them to constructively resolve conflicts.
  • Coordinate employee transfers or promotions into open positions, working with managers to ensure smooth transitions, and provide feedback on resulting salary changes as needed.
  • Focus on your clients; acknowledge and/or respond to inquiries from clients and colleagues promptly.
  • Leverage HR knowledge to partner with the business on special initiatives, org restructuring, workforce planning and succession management.
  • Ability and interest to learn the business’ core functions, culture and competition. 
  • Perform other duties as assigned.

Background/Skills Preferred:

  • Bachelor’s degree and 4+ years of related HR Generalist/HRBP experience 
  • PHR/SHRM-CP or SPHR/SHRM-SCP certification a plus.
  • Ability to travel occasionally including providing local support to the Boston, MA office (in addition to Wakefield, MA office)
  • Proficiency with standard computer applications (MS Office) and HRIS databases (SAP preferred). Strong Excel skills preferred.
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
  • Excellent problem-solving skills; highly motivated and results-oriented 
  • Strong interpersonal and relationship-building skills including comfort presenting to and partnering with senior leaders across the organization.
  • Ability to analyze data and recommend changes based on the analysis.
  • Strong ability to proactively identify and implement effective solutions
  • Self-starter with a drive for results
  • Leads programs and projects through to completion.

If you have this experience, feel you are a fit for this position, and are interested, please answer the questions below:

Your Email (required)

Position You Are Applying For?

What is your availability to start?

Are you open to a direct-hire position?

What is your current salary or pay rate?

Are you currently eligible to work for any employer in the US?

When is the best time to contact you and what # can you be reached at for this opportunity?

Upload Your Resume

Regards,

Mike Hanes
ProVisionTech

Direct-hire Director, Human Resources – Strategic Initiatives Opportunity in Irving, TX

Company Description

This company is the leader in outcome-based marketing. We enable marketing that’s built on proof, not promises. Through the company’s PeopleCloud, the marketing platform for personalizing consumer journeys with performance transparency, the company helps marketers anticipate, activate and prove measurable business outcomes. Powered by CORE ID®, the most accurate and stable identity management platform representing 200+ million people, this company’s award-winning data and technology is rooted in privacy by design and underpinned by powerful AI. With more than 50 years of experience in personalization and performance working with the world’s top brands, agencies and publishers, this company is a trusted partner leading CRM, digital media, loyalty and email programs. Positioned at the core of Publicis Groupe, this client is a global company with over 8,000 employees in over 40 offices around the world.

Job Description

Acting as Chief of Staff for the Chief Talent Officer (CTO) at the company, this position will translate the strategic initiatives for human capital development into deliverable projects in collaboration with the Human Resources (HR) Business Partners and HR department leads. The Director, HR will also lead activities to determine reporting, coordination, project scope, schedule, communication plans and budget baselines based on an understanding of human resources enterprise approach.

Position Responsibilities:

  • Partner with HR Leadership to manage project-based operations for the CTO to ensure that HR delivers on strategic goals efficiently and effectively.
  • Develop and manage complex, enterprise-wide HR project plans and deliverables.
  • Coordinate, prioritize, and modify HR deliverables with the HR leadership team to ensure alignment with the CTO’s strategic goals in support of business objectives.
  • Ensure the flow of pertinent communications to ensure preparedness and keep focus on the correct priorities, including working cross-functionally to provide complete, timely, and accurate information.
  • Anticipate the needs of the CTO for scheduled events, presentations, discussions, and recurring processes; research, prepare, socialize, and review materials as appropriate to the event.
  • Partner with other functions such as Corporate Communications and Finance to ensure coordinated support for HR efforts.
  • Develop implementation plans for organizational strategies, goals, and objectives, as needed.
  • Assist with developing and maintaining efficient HR-wide processes with measurable outcomes.
  • Lead activities focused on improving HR organizational effectiveness.

Qualifications:

10+ years HR experience including experience in technology-focused companies as an HR Business partner. Strong organizational, influence and conflict management skills, executive poise and presentation skills coupled with a high degree of organization. Bachelor’s degree in Human Resources or related field is preferred.

If you have this experience, feel you are a fit for this position, and are interested, please answer the questions below:

Your Email (required)

Position You Are Applying For?

What is your availability to start?

Are you open to a direct-hire position?

What is your current salary or pay rate?

Are you currently eligible to work for any employer in the US?

When is the best time to contact you and what # can you be reached at for this opportunity?

Upload Your Resume

Regards,

Mike Hanes
ProVisionTech

7 interview mistakes that cost you key IT hires

A subpar interview process is a chief reason why IT pros turn down job offers. Here’s how your hiring team may be sabotaging its chances of landing top talent in a tight market.

If you were to call Sherlock Holmes to help you discover why top tech talent who you’ve interviewed declined your reasonable offer, he might call your mystery common. But the killer is not — as you might believe — the mercurial nature of candidates, a failure of education, or anything outside the room where the interviews happen. It’s more likely that your process or team are inadvertently undermining your own efforts.

“People blame the candidates, but the interview process is the main reason people turn down jobs,” says Barbara Bruno, author of High-Tech High-Touch Recruiting: How to Attract and Retain the Best Talent by Improving the Candidate Experience.

It could be the questions you ask, the people asking the questions, or a host of other missteps that telegraph a subtle message to candidates to move along.

I asked hiring managers, recruiters, and directors of talent what — specifically — hiring teams are doing to cost them those key hires they so desperately want.

You’re fishing with the wrong bait

Candidates end up in your interview room because they responded to your job description. That’s your bait. As with actual fishing, the bait you use has a lot to do with what you catch. You might want to check that you are targeting the right people and expectations.

“There seems to be a huge disconnect right now between traditional job requisitions — that are a laundry list of skills — and how candidates will be evaluated on the job,” Bruno says.

Bruno suggests ditching the laundry list and instead taking a hard look at what your team needs in this role. “I always ask employers, ‘Can you give me five performance objectives?’ or ‘How will the candidate be evaluated in six months?’” Bruno says.

Once they are forced to answer those questions, she finds hiring teams discover that much of their “must have” list won’t be needed in the position. Even worse? There are many more skills — like the ability to prioritize, problem solve, communicate, and ask for help — that aren’t in the job description but that anyone who hopes to succeed in the role will need to possess.

Step back from your shopping list and think instead about what success in the role would look like. Then come up with skills and experiences that would genuinely help.

Read more HERE

Measuring IT project success post-COVID—and 4 leadership lessons learned

Despite challenges, the pandemic has unearthed opportunities from both a technology and strategic standpoint and has introduced new ways to measure the business value of digitization projects.

The pandemic has had a dramatic and adverse impact on companies of all sizes and geographic locations over the course of the past several months, including lost revenue, reduction of staff and cuts in IT budgets and spending.  However, as we look back, there were some positive aspects as well, and more to come as plans are put in place for a post-COVID recovery.

Most companies, for example, were able to quickly pivot to a work-from-home structure to support employee safety, sustain and even increase productivity, and for the most part keep business activities on track. The transition has been so successful that many organizations plan to keep a portion of their workforce remote for the foreseeable future, in part to provide resiliency in the face of uncertainties. Weaknesses in IT infrastructure, process, and resources also became very apparent during the pandemic, pushing many companies to reduce or eliminate legacy debt, improve security, and increase investments in cloud services.

One additional upshot of the COVID crisis is a significant increase in the pace of digital transformation activities that are rapidly changing business models and user behavior. The pandemic has not only accelerated digitization but has exponentially increased the adoption of a digital process. What we anticipated to happen in the next five years is happening now, and what we thought wouldn’t have worked in the past is now possible because of the pandemic.

Digitization becomes a must-have

The life insurance business, for example, often relies on face-to-face sales interactions.  But the pandemic turned that business model on its head.  While we were already working on digitizing the sales process, there were pieces that needed to be accelerated or there soon wouldn’t be a business model.  For us, digitization activities moved from nice-to-have to must-have in a matter of weeks. If we can’t get data electronically, underwrite automatically, or deliver policies digitally we can’t do business in today’s world.

Since March, we have delivered in less than 30 days two key initiatives that would have taken months, if not a year, to deliver under normal circumstances. The first is an automated underwriting process that uses data to manage risk up to $3MM without requiring the invasive process of going to a client’s house to take and test blood samples. The second project allowed us to electronically deliver policies to our customers since we had a limited in-office staff who did not want to rely on ‘snail mail,’ and agents could not meet the client to deliver the policy themselves. We are now working on the third transformational initiative that was originally projected to span multiple years but will now be done in 18 months.

Read more HERE

CIOs reshape IT culture in wake of pandemic

IT leaders are leaning on lessons learned from the pandemic to redefine IT cultures and refine IT strategies as they move toward a new year of uncertainty.

From the first days of the pandemic, IT leaders have had to grapple with wildly unexpected circumstances — from transitioning thousands of employees to a work-from-home (WFH) environment, to near overnight platform rollouts in support of virtual teams. And for many, culture has proved to be the key unsung factor in their organizations’ ability to navigate unprecedented times.

Companies that had not established a resilient, transformation-focused culture prior to COVID-19 have struggled in the face of global shutdowns that have disrupted business as usual. Organizations that either pivoted to or had already embraced a transformation mindset, however, have been better equipped to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing environment, and to protect the health of their teams and their bottom lines.

And with companies having to adjust to new approaches to collaboration and productivity, the pandemic has provided IT leaders an opportunity to rethink and refine IT culture moving forward. Remaining agile, adjusting strategies, nurturing new approaches to work — here’s how several high-profile CIOs have helped guide their organizations through the chaos, leveraging pandemic-related changes to establish a transformation-minded IT culture for the future.

Mitigating culture shock

Maintaining the culture and morale of individual teams and the organization as whole has added a unique layer to the challenges companies now face, and for many IT leaders, the pandemic has magnified the importance of communication.

Lisa Davis, senior vice president and CIO of Blue Shield of California, has always believed in leading with honesty and transparency. “At Blue Shield, the health and safety of our employees is our number one priority,” she says. “Understanding where they are and what’s needed for them to thrive and be productive is top of mind.”

But the pandemic has elevated the need to be present and accessible as well, as Davis says she’s made herself available to weigh in on decisions and take quick action in support of her employees and the mission of the organization.

“As leaders we need to set the tone,” she says. “We had a great company culture prior to the pandemic, so I think that made the transition a little easier, but open and transparent communication at all levels of the organization is essential.”

Davis says she encourages leaders to seek ways of building a sense of community and camaraderie throughout teams, investing in technology and collaboration tools to maximize the user experience and ultimately help employees feel connected.

Read more HERE

10 future trends and how CIOs can keep ahead in 2021

After a year disrupted by a global pandemic, the next normal is starting to take shape. Here’s a look at what’s ahead for IT organizations.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has unfolded, CIOs have faced epic challenges unlike any they’ve previously weathered. For many business leaders, recovery isn’t just a return to their former state but a top-to-bottom rethinking of what business they need to be in and how their business must be run. As the chief owners of the digital infrastructure that underpins all aspects of modern enterprises, CIOs must play pivotal roles in the road to recovery, seeking the “next normal” while still performing their traditional roles.

The following predictions, based on the IDC FutureScape: Worldwide CIO Agenda 2021 Predictions, present information about technologies, markets, and ecosystems to help CIOs better understand future trends and their impact on the enterprise, and offer guidance on complex, fast-moving environments, proposing prescriptive, actionable recommendations for the next five years.

1. By 2022, 65% of CIOs will digitally empower and enable frontline workers with data, AI, and security to extend their productivity, adaptability, and decision making in the face of rapid changes. Businesses need teams and workers to function more autonomously, making decisions in the face of great uncertainty. Frontline workers are in the best position to gain real-time knowledge of changes in customer behaviors and external environments. But they need access to data and intelligent tools embedded in their workflows in a seamless fashion. CIOs will need to bolster IT capabilities in data science, AI, and human-machine interface and advanced intelligent workflow design.

Recommendations:

  • Acquire talent through hiring, development, and partnering ahead of the curve to avoid critical gaps.
  • Create centers of excellence (COEs) for data/analytics, AI, machine learning (ML), and workflow and task automation.
  • Ensure strategies, policies, and tools are in place to secure sensitive data and ensure proper usage.
  • Plan for the evolution from directed digital workers to hybrid digital/human workers to self-governing digital workers.

2. By 2021, unable to find adaptive ways to counter escalating cyberattacks, unrest, trade wars, and sudden collapses, 30% of CIOs will fail in protecting trust—the foundation of customer confidence. According to a recent IDC survey, 63% of organizations are investing in cybersecurity to build digital trust for customers, employees, and partners. Despite these investments, almost one-third of CIOs will fail to fully surmount the fallout from adverse events as the intensity and diversity of threats escalate, resulting in degradation of trust in their businesses. CIOs will be expected to lead all technology aspects of risk management for the enterprise and its ecosystems at a time where funding is scarce and scrutinized.

Recommendations:

  • Rethink risk management strategies in the new context of high volatility, increased threats, and business uncertainty.
  • Embrace modern practices and leverage proven frameworks like NIST.
  • Create trust objectives and strategies to focus efforts on high-payoff initiatives.

Read more here

7 attributes every IT leader must have

Leadership has little to do with one’s title or seniority; it’s an attribute that’s earned over time through study, practice and commitment. Are you prepared to become a true leader?

Becoming a true IT leader — someone who inspires teams to consistently reach new heights — requires skills that can only be acquired over time through hard work and a commitment to succeed.

Transformational leaders are typically described as lively, passionate, engaging and energetic. Such individuals aren’t focused only on helping teams achieve their planned goals; they also work hard to help team members reach their full potential.

Becoming a respected and prized leader isn’t easy, but it’s a goal within reach of just about anyone who’s willing to commit to the task. Here are seven fundamental attributes every IT leader needs to possess — and how to acquire them.

  1. Agility
  2. Vision
  3. Empathy
  4. Steadiness
  5. Authenticity
  6. Accessibility
  7. Curiosity

Get more details HERE