What is NoOps? The quest for fully automated IT operations

Automation has IT leaders eyeing the possibility of environments with no hands-on operations work. But this evolution of DevOps may be more pipedream than practical reality.

Automation has become a widely used tool for streamlining IT operations, and Mindtree is one such organization removing manual processes from its infrastructure as it moves toward delivering a more fully automated environment.

The consulting and managed service provider’s strategy follows an ambitious goal prevalent in many tech organizations: To get away from the conventional work of IT operations and let machines handle it instead.

Such an environment, where there’s virtually no hands-on operations work, could deliver a faster, more frictionless development and deployment experience — meaning better turnaround times for business requests for new functions and services, says Rene Head, global vice president of infrastructure at Mindtree.

“It’s not just about IT delivery excellence; it’s a win for the business as well,” Head says.

That’s the promise of NoOps, an emerging IT trend that is pushing some organizations beyond the automation provided by DevOps to an infrastructure environment that requires no operations work.

What is NoOps?

NoOps is the idea that the software environment can be so completely automated that there’s no need for an operations team to manage it. NoOps, for “no operations,” is a concept that pushes forward a trend that has been on the march for a decade or more.

To be clear, NoOps is not the same as outsourcing your IT operations. It’s not about moving to SaaS or the cloud and expecting those vendors to run operations — although both managed service providers, such as Mindtree, and cloud companies are indeed on the NoOps journey themselves to gain more speed and agility in their own infrastructure.

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6 soft skills IT needs to succeed in the digital era

When it comes to transformation, tech expertise goes only so far. IT leaders must look for and develop traits not traditionally required for technologists in order to succeed in the years ahead.

As their companies seize on automation, AI and other leading-edge technologies to remake themselves into digital organizations, they’re finding they don’t have the skills they need.

Consider some numbers released by Gartner this fall: The IT research firm found that 70 percent of employees have not mastered the skills they need for their existing jobs while 80 percent lack the skills they need now and for future career success.

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The 8 biggest IT management mistakes

July 15, 2019/in Articles, Dallas IT Managers, IT Management, IT Managers /by admin

Sure, nobody’s perfect. But for those in charge of enterprise technology, the fallout from a strategic gaffe, bad hire, or weak spine can be disastrous. Here’s how to avoid (or recover from) big-time IT leadership mistakes.

Everybody makes mistakes. Most are harmless, some are embarrassing but forgivable, and some can take your career — or your company — down with them.

Some of the most common IT gaffes include becoming trapped in a relationship with a vendor you can’t shake loose, hiring or promoting the wrong people, and hiding problems from top management until it’s too late to recover.

When you’re in charge of enterprise technology, the risks are much higher and the fallout from mistakes can be much worse. So we’ve ranked them by order of severity: Level 1 (an embarrassing story you’d tell over a beer, but maybe not right away); Level 2 (one you can recover from, but don’t expect to be on the fast track for promotion); and Level 3 (you’re fired).

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7 ways IT leaders derail their careers

Falling off track is easy when you make a mistake that can turn a career superstar into a bit player.

The moment typically arrives without warning. An IT career that showed every sign of success — steady promotions, salary increases, a better office — suddenly slams to a halt. You’re fired, demoted or involuntarily plateaued. What happened?

It’s impossible to rebuild a broken career without first understanding how it was derailed. The “Success Express” frequently slips off the rails due to a mistake, oversight, offense or miscalculation made in total innocence or ignorance. Often, the victim doesn’t even realize that he or she has made a career-crippling move.

1. Not looking beyond IT

2. Failing to acquire critical non-IT skills

3. Neglecting business relationships

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The 10 most in-demand technology certifications for data and IT pros

In the world of IT and data management, certifications are important benchmarks that many organizations value when looking to hire people to fill various roles. And at a time when enterprises are especially hungry for certain skills, documentation that’s mapped to a specific skill set based on standardized testing is useful to employers as well as professionals.

The most in-demand data management certifications today reflect where many organizations are placing their emphasis as they look to leverage information resources.

Among the most popular certifications, according to technology staffing and consulting firm Robert Half Technology, are:

  • Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert: Cloud Platform Infrastructure
  • Java
  • Microsoft SQL Server
  • DevOps
  • AWS Certified Solutions Architect
  • .NET
  • Agile and Scrum
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate/Cisco Certified Network Professional
  • VMware
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional

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Top Five Reasons Tech Pros Should Earn Professional Certificates

eWEEK DATA POINTS: New IT jobs will require adeptness in relatively new fields such as artificial intelligence, machine learning and data science. Better get prequalified.

It’s no secret that tech automation is poised to upend many traditional careers. The good news is that if you have the right technical background, your skills are in greater demand than ever. In fact, according to a recent survey by the Consumer Technology Association, 92% of employers reported that they’ll “need more employees with technical skills.”

Many of these jobs will require adeptness in relatively new fields such as artificial intelligence, machine learning and data science.

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What an IT career will look like in 5 years

Emerging technologies and shifting workplace demands are reshaping the IT career horizon. Here are the changes experts see unfolding for IT roles and how IT work gets done.

If you sketched out how IT roles will change in the coming years, you’d likely envision tech roles maturing around emerging and high-value technologies, such as AI, data science, and the cloud, as well as a continuing focus on security across industries and business divisions.

These topics frequently came up in our discussions with tech leaders about the near future of IT roles. But so too did surprising insights — including potential new positions that don’t exist today.

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7 ways to make IT operations more efficient

Chances are your enterprise’s IT operations could use some improvement. Here are tips for getting key services on the fast track to higher performance and cost savings.

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6 soft skills IT needs to succeed in the digital era

When it comes to transformation, tech expertise goes only so far. IT leaders must look for and develop traits not traditionally required for technologists in order to succeed in the years ahead.

Read more here

10 bad IT hires to avoid

A bad IT hire can have a crippling ripple effect on team productivity. Here, IT leaders share their IT hiring horror stories — and tips on how they could have been avoided.

Tech leaders who’ve been in business for a while will recognize this scenario: A new hire who looks great on paper (or LinkedIn) gets a desk, an ID card and an attitude. Your promising new IT staffer is turning into a bad hire horror story.

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9 career lies IT pros tell themselves

IT lifers who see promotions and bleeding-edge projects handed to their colleagues may end up telling themselves it’s just a fluke, when in fact, their career path is stalling. And while it pays to fight for good opportunities rather than take flight from a problem, being in denial about your career can hurt your chance to make a correction.

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Essential traits of business-driven IT leaders

The CIO role is quickly transforming into one responsible for driving business change. Here’s how to shake up your approach and envision — and realize — positive business outcomes.

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13 signs your software project may be doomed

14 top paying big data jobs

14 top paying big data jobs | Information Management

Opinion The biggest data breaches and digital security threats of 2019

Winning the war for talent

Software projects can get derailed before you know it. Here are the subtle warning signs that your latest app dev initiative isn’t going quite as well as it seems. Read more…

What are the top IT jobs by salary?

Top IT salaries cluster around the current need for data analysis, cloud, and security expertise. Let’s look at top roles by salary

According to the Robert Half Technology 2019 salary guide (a trusted resource with data for more than 75 positions in the IT field), here are the top IT jobs by salary for 2019, ranked by national median salary:

1. Big data engineer: $155,000

2. Mobile applications developer: $143,500

3. Information systems security manager: $139,000

4. Applications architect: $135,750

5. Data architect: $133,500

6. Database manager: $129,500

7. Data security analyst: $125,500

8. Software engineer: $124,500

9. Wireless network engineer: $122,000

10. Data scientist: $121,500

Some other hot IT hiring areas worth mentioning include DevOps and cloud. DevOps salaries remain competitive because employers are competing for people with experience in a relatively new specialty. That means with some project work, you can transition into a DevOps-oriented job from a more traditional role.

Some other hot IT hiring areas worth mentioning include DevOps and cloud. DevOps salaries remain competitive because employers are competing for people with experience in a relatively new specialty. That means with some project work, you can transition into a DevOps-oriented job from a more traditional role.

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Want faster IT? Stop thinking like an IT engineer

Engineers may build a race car when the user asked for a bicycle. Here’s how IT leaders can encourage a more humanistic approach to problem-solving

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